Year Zero, review

Year Zero, by Rob Reid, is a story about royalties. You know, those little monetary payments made to music artists every time their work is played. When the songs are played over and over, the payments can add up. This is what happens when aliens show up in New York. They have been recording and using songs from Earth since 1977, and boy do they owe a lot of money! The copyright violation fines are going to bankrupt them. So the two alien representatives, Carly and Frampton, would like to make a deal.

Rob Reid takes a heck of a lot of digs at the music industry itself: the blood-sucking agents, the skewed contracts, nothing is shown mercy. It makes me glad I’m not a part of it!

There are also a lot of laughs as lawyer Nick Carter takes a trip into space to work things out with the aliens. Among the characters is an animated vacuum cleaner who INSISTS he is NOT a vacuum cleaner. I think he’s my favorite character.

"I am not a vacuum cleaner!"

This was a fun read, certainly more humorous than I was expecting. Recommended.


This unabridged audiobook was published by Books On Tape in 2012.

Year Zero, review

Year Zero, by Rob Reid, is a story about royalties. You know, those little monetary payments made to music artists every time their work is played. When the songs are played over and over, the payments can add up. This is what happens when aliens show up in New York. They have been recording and using songs from Earth since 1977, and boy do they owe a lot of money! The copyright violation fines are going to bankrupt them. So the two alien representatives, Carly and Frampton, would like to make a deal.

Rob Reid takes a heck of a lot of digs at the music industry itself: the blood-sucking agents, the skewed contracts, nothing is shown mercy. It makes me glad I’m not a part of it!

There are also a lot of laughs as lawyer Nick Carter takes a trip into space to work things out with the aliens. Among the characters is an animated vacuum cleaner who INSISTS he is NOT a vacuum cleaner. I think he’s my favorite character.

"I am not a vacuum cleaner!"

This was a fun read, certainly more humorous than I was expecting. Recommended.


This unabridged audiobook was published by Books On Tape in 2012.

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Symptoms of a Book Addict

Questions copied from Matthew at A Guy’s Moleskine Notebook

1. Read more than one book a month?
Yes. About 4.

2. Read more than one book a week?
Sometimes.

3. Read more than one book a day?
Not unless it’s a graphic novel.

4. Read more than one book at the same time?
Always, because sometimes I’m not in the mood for one I’m reading, so I switch back and forth.

5. Read more than two or three books at the same time?
Usually three.

6. Lose track of the number of books you are reading at the same time?
Yes!

7. Prefer dates with books over dates with strangers?
Absolutely.

8. Prefer dates with books over dates with friends?
I have way more books than friends. Do the math.

9. Fall asleep with a book more than once/twice/thrice a week?
Not more, but at least once a week.

10. Actually never fall asleep with a book because who has time to sleep when this book needs finishing?
The only reason I sleep is because I want to be alert at work the next day.

11. Have books on your bedside table?
Always.

12. Have one/two/three bookshelves at home?
I have an entire room with nothing but books.

13. Have a library card?
Yes.

14. Read while at the dinner table?
I’m usually dining alone, so yes.

15. Read while a friend is talking to you?
Well…. Yeah.

16. Read while walking down the street?
I’m guilty.

17. Read while riding your bike?
My bike was stolen.

18. Read while driving?
Never!

19. Ever laugh out loud or cry while reading a book?
Yes.

20. Ever swear, swear audibly, or yell under your breath while reading a book?
Oh yes.

21. Ever throw the book you’re reading across the room because WHY?
No! Books are precious!

22. Ever miss your subway stop/train stop because you’re reading a book?
Yes! :-D

23. Ever call in sick to work so that you can finish a book?
No.

24. Ever wear headphones (no music) while reading so no one interrupts you?
No, but that is an excellent idea!

25. Give books instead of advice when a friend comes to you for help?
I can’t stand self-help books, so No.

26. Have extreme rules for whenever you loan a book to a friend?
Just the usual: don’t dog-ear, no stains, and YES I WANT IT BACK!

27. Have trouble walking past a bookstore?
Oh yes, I carry my want list with me at all times.

28. Know all of your local booksellers by name?
Not all.

29. Take your paycheck straight to your local bookstore?
Just about.

30. Sacrifice all your belongings aside from your books if you ever do end up having to move?
I moved about 900 books five months ago and did just fine.

31. Get a little tyrannical when it comes to book clubs?
No, I only join online groups where I can remain low-key.

32. Follow more authors than friends on Twitter?
Way more. I think all of the people I follow are in the book publishing business, either authors or publishers or reviewers.

33. Carry at least one book on your person at all times?
Yes I do.

34. Ever try to cook meals featured in your favorite books?
No. Books with recipes are too gimmicky for me.

35. Always read the book before you see the movie?
I try to, but if I don’t get around to reading the book I usually don’t see the movie.

36. Judge people by their taste in books?
Absolutely.

37. Get jealous of your local bookstore’s cat?
No cats can’t read.

I happily admit to being a Book Addict! There are a lot worse things to be out of control with!

How do you fare with these questions? Are you a Book Addict?

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Creepy Susie and 13 other tragic tales for troubled children is NOT a book for young children. It looks like it’s for children but it ISN’T. Very young readers should probably be dissuaded from getting their hands on it. If your child knows about “the birds and the bees” then go for it. Just thought you needed to know this before I move on.

As I was unpacking a box of books this weekend, one that was originally boxed up in 2009, I came across this book that I didn’t remember owning. It isn’t listed in my database and I don’t remember how I came to own it. It most assuredly IS mine, because someone put my name in it in a rather bloody red gothic style.

Creepy Susie was written by Angus Oblong and published by Ballantine Books in hardcover. It contains very short illustrated stories about very disturbed children. The stories tend to put a smile on your face. Stories with names like Stupid Betsy, Rosie’s Crazy Mother, Milo’s Disorder, and Dick and Muffy. Yes, I said it.

There is a lot of death. In a humorous vein. In an adult humorous vein. In a disturbed adult humorous vein.

I enjoyed reading this because I do like disturbed humor. ;-)

Creepy Susie and 13 other tragic tales for troubled children is NOT a book for young children. It looks like it’s for children but it ISN’T. Very young readers should probably be dissuaded from getting their hands on it. If your child knows about “the birds and the bees” then go for it. Just thought you needed to know this before I move on.

As I was unpacking a box of books this weekend, one that was originally boxed up in 2009, I came across this book that I didn’t remember owning. It isn’t listed in my database and I don’t remember how I came to own it. It most assuredly IS mine, because someone put my name in it in a rather bloody red gothic style.

Creepy Susie was written by Angus Oblong and published by Ballantine Books in hardcover. It contains very short illustrated stories about very disturbed children. The stories tend to put a smile on your face. Stories with names like Stupid Betsy, Rosie’s Crazy Mother, Milo’s Disorder, and Dick and Muffy. Yes, I said it.

There is a lot of death. In a humorous vein. In an adult humorous vein. In a disturbed adult humorous vein.

I enjoyed reading this because I do like disturbed humor. ;-)

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A WRITER’S SAN FRANCISCO

I’m glad this book is a mere 130 pages, because I don’t think I could stand another reference of Paris in a book that’s supposed to be about San Francisco.

A WRITER’S SAN FRANCISCO, by Eric Maisel, and published by New World Library, first caught my eye because it is illustrated with drawings by my favorite San Franciscan artist: Paul Madonna.

If you like Madonna’s art, please get his book: ALL OVER COFFEE.

A WRITER’S SAN FRANCISCO

I’m glad this book is a mere 130 pages, because I don’t think I could stand another reference of Paris in a book that’s supposed to be about San Francisco.

A WRITER’S SAN FRANCISCO, by Eric Maisel, and published by New World Library, first caught my eye because it is illustrated with drawings by my favorite San Franciscan artist: Paul Madonna.

If you like Madonna’s art, please get his book: ALL OVER COFFEE.

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Bonkers

I had a lot of fun listening to Jennifer Saunders narrate her book, Bonkers: My Life In Laughs. I’m a big fan of one of her shows, Absolutely Fabulous, which my daughter and I would quote continuously when it was on TV in the early 2000s. Saunders did much of the writing for that show.

The book gives a detailed history of her career and the people she worked with both on and off the screen or stage.

One of my favorite people in Saunder’s life is her agent. The conversations between the two of them remind me of some of the minimalist patter between Patsy and Edina, the main characters on AbFab. Quite funny!

She states she wrote the book because someone talked her into it. I’m glad they did. Not only does she speak about her comedy but she touches on her battle with breast cancer, also with humor.

It’s mesmerizing and hilarious. Recommended!

Penguin published this audiobook in 2012.

Bonkers

I had a lot of fun listening to Jennifer Saunders narrate her book, Bonkers: My Life In Laughs. I’m a big fan of one of her shows, Absolutely Fabulous, which my daughter and I would quote continuously when it was on TV in the early 2000s. Saunders did much of the writing for that show.

The book gives a detailed history of her career and the people she worked with both on and off the screen or stage.

One of my favorite people in Saunder’s life is her agent. The conversations between the two of them remind me of some of the minimalist patter between Patsy and Edina, the main characters on AbFab. Quite funny!

She states she wrote the book because someone talked her into it. I’m glad they did. Not only does she speak about her comedy but she touches on her battle with breast cancer, also with humor.

It’s mesmerizing and hilarious. Recommended!

Penguin published this audiobook in 2012.

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Hard To Be A God

In 1964 Arkady and Boris Strugatsky managed to get past the Russian censors and publish a little science-fictiony book called Hard To Be A God. After publication, the critics accused them of “abstractionism” and “surrealism”. Can you imagine! Now, a great new translation by Olena Bormashenko and published in 2014 by Chicago Review Press, is available.

The story blends light science fiction, medieval torture, and totalitarianism. Rumata is a god sent from Earth to another planet to record the goings-on through a camera installed in a circlet on his head. The current regime on this medieval planet, the “grays”, torture and kill anyone who is literate. A second regime eventually takes over, the “clerics”, who are essentially no different than the grays- they go about torturing and killing as well. All is not doom and gloom. The Strugatsky brothers liberally sprinkle lines of humor here and there.
I had to really pay attention to the subtext of irony in order to try to ferret out the meanings behind the words. The book was written in 1963 in Russia, and to live there under the circumstances of the time was to be wary of expressing dissent.

I’m finding it hard to put into words how much I love this book. I applaud Arkady and Boris in their braveness. At the end of the book, Boris writes an Afterword that is extremely informative and shines a light on their struggle to complete the work and on the effect of its publication.

The Strugatsky brothers did a marvelous job of pointing out the idiocy of bureaucratic punishments:

"The official dragged a long yellow nail along the list. "Don Keu…Don Keu…" he muttered, "Don Keu…Royal Street, Building Twelve?"
“Yes,” Don Keu said in an irritated bass voice.
“Number four hundred eighty-five, Brother Tibak.”
The heavyset Brother Tibak, who was sitting at the adjacent table, crimson from the stuffy air, searched through the papers, wiped the sweat off his bald head, stood up, and read out monotonously, “Number four hundred and eighty-five, Don Keu. Royal, Twelve, for defamation of the name of his grace the Bishop of Arkanar Don Reba, which took place at the palace ball the year before last, shall receive three dozen lashes on his bared buttocks, and shall kiss His Grace’s boot.”
Brother Tibak sat down.
“Down that corridor,” said the official in a colorless voice, “the lashes on the right, the boot on the left. Next.”

and the quickness of adaptation by the masses to a new regime:

"The habit of enduring and adapting turns people into dumb beasts, who differ from the animals in nothing but anatomy, and who only exceed them in helplessness. And each new day gives rise to a new horror of evil and violence."

Anyone interested in a politically charged light (very) science fiction read should enjoy Hard To Be A God.

Hard To Be A God

In 1964 Arkady and Boris Strugatsky managed to get past the Russian censors and publish a little science-fictiony book called Hard To Be A God. After publication, the critics accused them of “abstractionism” and “surrealism”. Can you imagine! Now, a great new translation by Olena Bormashenko and published in 2014 by Chicago Review Press, is available.

The story blends light science fiction, medieval torture, and totalitarianism. Rumata is a god sent from Earth to another planet to record the goings-on through a camera installed in a circlet on his head. The current regime on this medieval planet, the “grays”, torture and kill anyone who is literate. A second regime eventually takes over, the “clerics”, who are essentially no different than the grays- they go about torturing and killing as well. All is not doom and gloom. The Strugatsky brothers liberally sprinkle lines of humor here and there.

I had to really pay attention to the subtext of irony in order to try to ferret out the meanings behind the words. The book was written in 1963 in Russia, and to live there under the circumstances of the time was to be wary of expressing dissent.

I’m finding it hard to put into words how much I love this book. I applaud Arkady and Boris in their braveness. At the end of the book, Boris writes an Afterword that is extremely informative and shines a light on their struggle to complete the work and on the effect of its publication.

The Strugatsky brothers did a marvelous job of pointing out the idiocy of bureaucratic punishments:

"The official dragged a long yellow nail along the list. "Don Keu…Don Keu…" he muttered, "Don Keu…Royal Street, Building Twelve?"
“Yes,” Don Keu said in an irritated bass voice.
“Number four hundred eighty-five, Brother Tibak.”
The heavyset Brother Tibak, who was sitting at the adjacent table, crimson from the stuffy air, searched through the papers, wiped the sweat off his bald head, stood up, and read out monotonously, “Number four hundred and eighty-five, Don Keu. Royal, Twelve, for defamation of the name of his grace the Bishop of Arkanar Don Reba, which took place at the palace ball the year before last, shall receive three dozen lashes on his bared buttocks, and shall kiss His Grace’s boot.”
Brother Tibak sat down.
“Down that corridor,” said the official in a colorless voice, “the lashes on the right, the boot on the left. Next.”

and the quickness of adaptation by the masses to a new regime:

"The habit of enduring and adapting turns people into dumb beasts, who differ from the animals in nothing but anatomy, and who only exceed them in helplessness. And each new day gives rise to a new horror of evil and violence."

Anyone interested in a politically charged light (very) science fiction read should enjoy Hard To Be A God.

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HEAT WAVE, written by Richard Castle, is the first book in the Nikki Heat fiction series. Nikki is a homicide investigator in New York. She has a tag-along in the form of Jameson Rook, a reporter researching her occupation.
Richard Castle is also the name of the writer character on the television show CASTLE. In the show he writes detective novels and also follows a female detective.
I listened to the audio version of the book published by Hyperion. I wasn’t impressed by the narration but the story was good.
The story starts with Detective Heat arriving at the scene of deceased real estate mogul Matthew Starr, an older man who fell to his death from the 6th floor of an upscale apartment building. The wealthy man left behind a widow who doesn’t appear to be all that grief-stricken, an attractive young nanny, and a missing art collection. More deaths pile up before Heat gets to the bottom of Starr’s demise.
It was a fun book to listen to as I worked. There were some twists and turns, some tense moments, and, like on the TV series, some sexual tension between the two main characters.
I’m looking forward to reading the second book in the series!

HEAT WAVE, written by Richard Castle, is the first book in the Nikki Heat fiction series. Nikki is a homicide investigator in New York. She has a tag-along in the form of Jameson Rook, a reporter researching her occupation.
Richard Castle is also the name of the writer character on the television show CASTLE. In the show he writes detective novels and also follows a female detective.
I listened to the audio version of the book published by Hyperion. I wasn’t impressed by the narration but the story was good.
The story starts with Detective Heat arriving at the scene of deceased real estate mogul Matthew Starr, an older man who fell to his death from the 6th floor of an upscale apartment building. The wealthy man left behind a widow who doesn’t appear to be all that grief-stricken, an attractive young nanny, and a missing art collection. More deaths pile up before Heat gets to the bottom of Starr’s demise.
It was a fun book to listen to as I worked. There were some twists and turns, some tense moments, and, like on the TV series, some sexual tension between the two main characters.
I’m looking forward to reading the second book in the series!

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THE BURNING DARK is the spookiest book I’ve read since SALEM’S LOT. The two stories are in no way related other than the fact that they both scared me and made me jump at shadows. Adam Christopher’s story weaves outer space, gigantic mechanical spiders, space warfare, and ghosts together in a page-turner that had me seeing shadows everywhere!  
In the 30th Century, Ida (short for Idaho) Cleveland is a recently retired captain in the Fleet, a hero after saving millions of people in a horrific battle with Spiders who can crush planets.  On board the U-Star Coast City stationary orbital platform to oversee its deconstruction, Ida is surprised to find that no one in the minimally staffed station has ever heard of him. As he tries to contact his former compatriots, whose records are also mysteriously empty, the communications die. He starts seeing shadows in the empty hallways. People start disappearing.
He has built a small radio in his room and way down on the dial, in the frequencies of subspace, he starts hearing a woman’s voice. Soon, the voice starts speaking directly to him.
In the station the air temperature fluctuates wildly but is blamed on the deconstruction in progress. Yet Ida notices it gets icy cold whenever he “sees” a shadow.

 Her eyes glowed blue in the station’s night.
“Contact has been established,” she whispered. At her words the shadows roiled, peeling out of the corners of the corridor and sweeping around her in a slow orbit. Within moments she was the center of a storm of night. The shadows, alive, kissed her skin.
She reached out and pointed at DeJohn’s back. The marine’s eyes rolled up until only the whites were showing, and then he jolted like he’d been shocked, and then he turned around. The shadows coalesced around him too, and together the pair stood in the dark on Phi Deck, the world dimming around them until the only light was the light of her eyes, blue and terrible and aflame.

King is the ineffectual provost marshal on the Coast City. The missing Commandant Elbridge has left a message for him in a coded book. Does this book hold the answers to what is going on?
The famous Zia Hollywood is scheduled to stop at Coast City to refuel her mining ship. Zia, with her everpresent rectangular dark glasses, is hard to read. Is she visiting just to refuel, or does she have other motives? This much Ida knows; her sentient body markings spook him.
Despite a couple of scenes that don’t make much sense, the rest of the book is SO GOOD that I forgive Christopher easily.
Is Ida crazy? Who are the shadows? Who is the real Zia? From Tau Retore to forbidden forests in Japan, this is an unnerving ride!
Why do I love this book? BECAUSE IT TRULY SCARED ME! Why should you read it? Because you will love it!

THE BURNING DARK is the spookiest book I’ve read since SALEM’S LOT. The two stories are in no way related other than the fact that they both scared me and made me jump at shadows. Adam Christopher’s story weaves outer space, gigantic mechanical spiders, space warfare, and ghosts together in a page-turner that had me seeing shadows everywhere! 

In the 30th Century, Ida (short for Idaho) Cleveland is a recently retired captain in the Fleet, a hero after saving millions of people in a horrific battle with Spiders who can crush planets.  On board the U-Star Coast City stationary orbital platform to oversee its deconstruction, Ida is surprised to find that no one in the minimally staffed station has ever heard of him. As he tries to contact his former compatriots, whose records are also mysteriously empty, the communications die. He starts seeing shadows in the empty hallways. People start disappearing.

He has built a small radio in his room and way down on the dial, in the frequencies of subspace, he starts hearing a woman’s voice. Soon, the voice starts speaking directly to him.

In the station the air temperature fluctuates wildly but is blamed on the deconstruction in progress. Yet Ida notices it gets icy cold whenever he “sees” a shadow.

 Her eyes glowed blue in the station’s night.

“Contact has been established,” she whispered. At her words the shadows roiled, peeling out of the corners of the corridor and sweeping around her in a slow orbit. Within moments she was the center of a storm of night. The shadows, alive, kissed her skin.

She reached out and pointed at DeJohn’s back. The marine’s eyes rolled up until only the whites were showing, and then he jolted like he’d been shocked, and then he turned around. The shadows coalesced around him too, and together the pair stood in the dark on Phi Deck, the world dimming around them until the only light was the light of her eyes, blue and terrible and aflame.

King is the ineffectual provost marshal on the Coast City. The missing Commandant Elbridge has left a message for him in a coded book. Does this book hold the answers to what is going on?

The famous Zia Hollywood is scheduled to stop at Coast City to refuel her mining ship. Zia, with her everpresent rectangular dark glasses, is hard to read. Is she visiting just to refuel, or does she have other motives? This much Ida knows; her sentient body markings spook him.

Despite a couple of scenes that don’t make much sense, the rest of the book is SO GOOD that I forgive Christopher easily.

Is Ida crazy? Who are the shadows? Who is the real Zia? From Tau Retore to forbidden forests in Japan, this is an unnerving ride!

Why do I love this book? BECAUSE IT TRULY SCARED ME! Why should you read it? Because you will love it!

1
In DOLL BONES, (which won a Newberry Honor 2014 and was a Carnegie Medal Nominee for Young Adult 2014) Holly Black tells the story of 12-year-old Zach, who likes to play in imaginary worlds with his friends Alice and Poppy. They use small toys to play the characters of pirates, mermaids, and queens. Over time, the characters have had many quests. Zach is at an age where he knows that his schoolmates would make fun of him if they knew that he often plays like this, still, he doesn’t want to give up the game that brings him so much happiness.
The queen is played by a very old doll, who sits in a locked glass case in Poppy’s house. Poppy believes the ghost of a young girl visits her and tells her she was murdered and that her bones are in the doll. The story of the mysterious origin of the doll leads the three children to go on their own quest to find the burial place of the girl who was murdered so long ago.
There are some truly creepy scenes in the story, of which you’ll just have to read the book to find out what they are!
Also within the story is the conflict of the children’s feelings in realizing that they are all growing up and will eventually move away from childhood games.
Will Zach, Polly, and Alice find the murdered girl’s grave? Will the mystery of her murder be solved? Is the doll really made with her bones? Can the three children remain friends?
I enjoyed DOLL BONES. It had some minor (no pun intended) bumps but is well worth a read.

 
Audiobook, 244 pages, Published May 7, 2013 by Listening Library, ISBN 9780804122917

In DOLL BONES, (which won a Newberry Honor 2014 and was a Carnegie Medal Nominee for Young Adult 2014) Holly Black tells the story of 12-year-old Zach, who likes to play in imaginary worlds with his friends Alice and Poppy. They use small toys to play the characters of pirates, mermaids, and queens. Over time, the characters have had many quests. Zach is at an age where he knows that his schoolmates would make fun of him if they knew that he often plays like this, still, he doesn’t want to give up the game that brings him so much happiness.

The queen is played by a very old doll, who sits in a locked glass case in Poppy’s house. Poppy believes the ghost of a young girl visits her and tells her she was murdered and that her bones are in the doll. The story of the mysterious origin of the doll leads the three children to go on their own quest to find the burial place of the girl who was murdered so long ago.

There are some truly creepy scenes in the story, of which you’ll just have to read the book to find out what they are!

Also within the story is the conflict of the children’s feelings in realizing that they are all growing up and will eventually move away from childhood games.

Will Zach, Polly, and Alice find the murdered girl’s grave? Will the mystery of her murder be solved? Is the doll really made with her bones? Can the three children remain friends?

I enjoyed DOLL BONES. It had some minor (no pun intended) bumps but is well worth a read.

 

Audiobook, 244 pages, Published May 7, 2013 by Listening Library, ISBN 9780804122917

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I love Jim Gaffigan’s humor. It’s so relevant to my life. His book, DAD IS FAT, is his ruminations on what its like to live with five young kids in a small apartment in New York City. Ok, I don’t have five kids and I don’t live in NYC but I do have two children, and I’ve experienced just about everything he mentions when it comes to dealing with raising them.
Parents will definitely get the most out of this book, as they can laugh with familiarity along with Jim’s experiences. I found myself nodding in agreement as Gaffigan related trying to navigate getting ready to leave the apartment, or taking the children to a restaurant, or trying to get them to go to bed. I don’t always agree with his parenting techniques, but to each their own.
Listening to Gaffigan read on the audiobook is great, although there are a few times he seems to be rushing it (I can’t imagine he’d be TIRED, can you?!)
If you have children, love children, spend time around children, go to your nearest independent bookstore (or order online from them!) and get this book right now!

Audiobook, Unabridged, Overdrive Edition, Published May 15th 2013 by Books on Tape (first published January 1st 2013), ISBN13: 9780804148023

I love Jim Gaffigan’s humor. It’s so relevant to my life. His book, DAD IS FAT, is his ruminations on what its like to live with five young kids in a small apartment in New York City. Ok, I don’t have five kids and I don’t live in NYC but I do have two children, and I’ve experienced just about everything he mentions when it comes to dealing with raising them.

Parents will definitely get the most out of this book, as they can laugh with familiarity along with Jim’s experiences. I found myself nodding in agreement as Gaffigan related trying to navigate getting ready to leave the apartment, or taking the children to a restaurant, or trying to get them to go to bed. I don’t always agree with his parenting techniques, but to each their own.

Listening to Gaffigan read on the audiobook is great, although there are a few times he seems to be rushing it (I can’t imagine he’d be TIRED, can you?!)

If you have children, love children, spend time around children, go to your nearest independent bookstore (or order online from them!) and get this book right now!

Audiobook, Unabridged, Overdrive Edition, Published May 15th 2013 by Books on Tape (first published January 1st 2013), ISBN13: 9780804148023

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